What will a CSA farm share include? How much does it cost?


Contents and cost

A half share is an insulated bag (16"x13"x9'') of very fresh vegetables late on every Friday afternoon through October 6.   A full share is probably enough for four people including a teenager -- it is as much as my two-person vegetarian household eats but I eat like a farmer. I should have called it a double share. A half share has been plenty for several two-person households. 

The picture  above is a  *half* share for one week in June. Kale, romaine, herbs and scallions, beets, carrots, radishes, snap peas, and butter lettuce. That costs $40 a week, delivered. The full planned season in 2023 was every Friday, June 9-Oct 6.

Also in the planting plan, in their various seasons: chard; spinach; small turnips; snap beans;  hoophouse (warm-climate) crops, including several varieties of tomatoes; and eventually dry beans and baking squash.

If it gets too smoky to work safely outside, there will be less harvested. CSA is a risk-sharing economic approach and bad weather is always a farmers' first risk. I am trying to get a lot of things growing early, with the warm weather -- I figure I can harvest and wash in a respirator, but I can't dig and hoe in one. 

SOLD OUT FOR SUMMER 2023

I've sold my whole season! Hurrah!

I will *probably* have a few weeks of fall crops as the weather winds down in October and mayyyybe September; email me if you're interested in fall-special weekly mail.


If you're interested in *next* year, 2024, email me and I will email you when I'm starting up again.

MONTHLY SHARES or the REST OF THE SEASON:

I'll sell a month of deliveries at a time now that we're midseason -- $160 for four deliveries of a half share.   Email to ask if I'm booked up for the month. 

I have one quarter-share to sell, too, a half-share every other week -- because the veg are so fresh when you get them many of them last well into the second week in your fridge. 

If you want the rest of the season, it will be $40 per delivery, however many that is. 

TO SIGN UP:

Email me at farmer@wordofmouth.farm . We'll figure out delivery, payment, etc. And I'll drop off veg on Friday! 

Delivery

I deliver to North Capitol Hill in Seattle, Washington (because I live here). I will deliver straight to your door, texting you an announcement as I leave the farm in Woodinville and when I drop off an hour or two later; or if you prefer I'll put your insulated share on my front porch for you to pick up. 

I need the insulated bag back next week! I sanitize and reuse them.   

If you can't use the delivery in a week, I will deliver it to a neighbor or to a food bank for you.  I can't postpone the week til later if I've already sold the future weeks. 

 
Questions? farmer@wordofmouth.farm


More details about the contents

Greens

Lots of greens! I love fresh greens and the Seattle region is good for them, especially in spring. That includes spinach, braising greens like kale, many kinds of lettuce,  fresh herbs like basil and cilantro. Pak choi. Amaranth in high summer because it doesn't mind heat. 

Tomatoes

My plot has a hoophouse! That was a last-minute possibility and a big addition to the plan. I look forward to growing a lot of plants that like a warmer, more humid climate than we have most years. That's TOMATOES. And basil. Also cucumbers to round out the salad.   There are ten tomato plants for each farm share, of seven kinds of tomatoes over the course of tomato season (July till frost). I'm trying okra and watermelons, since it's a warm year.

Sturdy salad, tender stir-fry

Carrots, baby beets, baby turnips, radishes; all of these to be harvested while they're still young and tender. Green onions, because I always find them handy when cooking. 

Autumn crops

In high summer, new kinds of crops go into the warm ground: beans and squashes that we start harvesting as the year gets autumnal. Leeks will have had time to get bigger. We find a cool place to germinate sturdy greens that will grow as the days get cooler and get a little sweet in the first frost. There should even be a round of autumn lettuce when the weather cools off before it's too cold for lettuce to grow.